Ontario Independent

Thursday, June 30, 2022

As GTA workers return to work, a hybrid model is being embraced

As workers in the GTA return to work, a hybrid model is being embraced.

Key Takeaways:

  • Susan Griffith’s commute from Keswick, Ont. to Toronto is long, but she doesn’t have to make it five days a week anymore.
  • Companies have used video conferencing platforms to communicate without having to meet in person or even be in the same cubicle.
  • According to Malini Vijaykumar, an employment lawyer with Nelligan Law, hybrid working models are becoming more popular.

Susan Griffith’s commute to Toronto from Keswick, Ont., is long, but she no longer has to make it five days a week.

Her profession is sales and service in the insurance industry. Like many other Ontarians, she has had to adjust to a workplace where the pandemic has drastically altered.

“I’ve been working from home pretty well,” she told Global News, “but they did introduce the year before, voluntarily returning for a few of us for mental health.” “As a result, I offered to return for a couple of days.”

Also read: A man in Ontario was fined $110 for removing his licence plate

Companies have relied on video conferencing platforms to communicate without meeting face-to-face or even being in the same cubicle. Griffith has undoubtedly been advantages, but she admits that keeping her work life separate from her personal life has been difficult.

“I’ve found that working from home allows you to work more hours,” she explained. “So I had to keep an eye on that because I’d have to stop with my commute.” I might send a few emails on the GO bus, but when I got home, I was home.”

It’s about more than being physically present at the office for Griffith. She has worked in North York for many years, and one of the main reasons she returned was to help the local economy.

Hybrid model being embraced as GTA workers return to the office |  Globalnews.ca
As workers in the GTA return to work, a hybrid model is being embraced. Image from Global News

Many restaurants, cafes, and small businesses can be found along Yonge Street north of Sheppard Avenue. There was a lot of foot traffic before the pandemic.

Mayor John Tory emphasized the importance of employees returning to downtown buildings on Monday, saying their absence has impacted transit ridership and, as a result, the city’s finances.

Hybrid working models are becoming more popular, according to Malini Vijaykumar, an employment lawyer with Nelligan Law.

Her current advice to employers is to be flexible in their decision-making.

“If your return to work plan doesn’t include the necessary flexibility to accommodate employees as well as their unique circumstances, which may have evolved during the pandemic,” she explained, “you might discover yourself at risk of a human rights complaint or a constructive dismissal complaint.”

“I believe it is a losing proposition, and we are moving forward to a new, more flexible work future.”

Source: Global news

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