Ontario Independent

Thursday, June 30, 2022

More cases of monkeypox are being investigated by Toronto officials

More cases of monkeypox are being looked at by Toronto officials.

Key Takeaways:

  • Four instances of monkeypox are being investigated in Toronto, according to public health experts.
  • The first laboratory-confirmed case was reported on May 26 in a man in his 40s who had contact with somebody who has just visited Montreal.
  • Symptoms include swollen lymph nodes, fever, muscle aches, and a rash or lesions seven to fourteen days after contact.

According to public health experts, four instances of monkeypox are being investigated in Toronto.

According to Toronto Public Health, only one positive instance of the disease has been confirmed thus far. A total of eight other suspected instances have turned out to be false positives.

“We’ll continue to keep the public informed,” officials wrote on social media. “No new lab-confirmed case has been recorded since our last update.”

Monday through Friday at 3 p.m., Toronto Public Health will update a new dashboard.

Also read: Jason Spezza, a player for the Toronto Maple Leafs, has announced his retirement

There was one verified case and four possible illnesses as of Friday. On May 26, the first lab-confirmed case was reported in a guy in his 40s who had contact with someone who had just visited Montreal. Officials stated the patient was “stable” in the hospital at the time.

Previous Monday, Ontario’s chief medical officer of health issued an order requiring all possible or suspected cases of monkeypox to be reported to public health authorities.

More cases of monkeypox are being looked at by Toronto officials.
More cases of monkeypox are being looked at by Toronto officials. Image from iHeartRadio

According to public health professionals, monkeypox “does not generally” spread from person to person. It is carried mostly by bodily fluid contact, although it can also be spread through prolonged face-to-face contact.

Swollen lymph nodes, Fever, muscle aches, and also a rash or lesions are common symptoms seven to fourteen days after contact. A person is considered infectious from 5 days before the rash emerges until the lesions have begun to scab and fall off.

According to officials, the virus is rarely lethal.

Source: Global news

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