Ontario Independent

Wednesday, January 26, 2022

A Canadian highway sign is getting a facelift to make it look more accurate

A highway sign in Canada is getting a more accurate

Key takeaways:

  • The design of an Alberta woman is about to be implemented across Canada by transportation authorities.
  • Chloe Chapdelaine, an 18-year-old graphic design student living in a trailer outside of Foremost, Alta., was struck by creative inspiration.

After four years of designing and proposing a new, more accurate-looking moose crossing sign, Canadian transportation authorities are about to implement the design of an Alberta woman’s across the country.

Chloe Chapdelaine, an 18-year-old graphic design student living in a trailer outside of Foremost, Alta., was struck by creative inspiration.

She drove past a moose crossing sign every day on her way to work, and it didn’t seem right. She began inquiring around as a result.

Also read: A northern Ontario couple’s trip to the United States ends in a quarantine nightmare

“‘Hey, have you guys seen the highway sign yet?’ When I brought it up, I asked my coworkers. ‘What are your thoughts on that, guys?'” CTV National News covered her statement. “They all yelled, ‘Oh my God!’ Is it even a moose? ‘Does it look like a moose to you?'”

For years, roadways across the country have featured the “sad, sloppy” moose silhouette sign with a “droopy” nose.

According to Chapdelaine, it had several anatomical flaws, prompting her to take out a sharpie and sketch a new one. She gave the moose a shorter tail, a more “proud” and “majestic” snout, and a less projecting chest.

A Canadian Highway Sign Is Getting A More Accurate
A Canadian Highway Sign Is Getting A More Accurate. Image from WorldNewsEra

She also penned a lighthearted critique of the sign at the time and an essay explaining why the moose is an iconic Canadian animal, which she addressed to several transportation departments and agencies along with her drawing.

“I didn’t expect to hear anything,” she explained. “To be honest, I’d forgotten I’d sent it in the first place because it was such a spur-of-the-moment whim.”

One of Chapdelaine’s letters finally reached the attention of the Transportation Association of Canada after nearly four years.

She received a request for permission to use the image she created on new signs and in the agency’s manual earlier this year. Chapdelaine was not compensated for the design, but she couldn’t say no to the request.

She remarked, “It’s such a great Canadian legacy to have.” “I don’t think I’ll ever do anything more Canadian than this,” says the author.

The new signs are already being used around the country to replace their bizarrely shaped predecessors.

Source: CTV News

Get Canada and Ontario’s top News, Market news, and other worldwide news only on Ontario Independent

Show More

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *