Ontario Independent

Saturday, January 29, 2022

A northern Ontario couple’s trip to the United States ends in a quarantine nightmare

For a northern Ontario couple, a trip to the United States ends in a quarantine nightmare.

Key takeaways:

  • After a three-day trip to the United States, a couple from northern Ontario is being held in isolation for two weeks.
  • The pair was in the United States to buy a snowmobile and were told to pull over to the side when they arrived at the border.

A couple from northern Ontario is being held in isolation for two weeks after a three-day excursion to the United States.

After submitting all of their documentation to the ArriveCan app, Suzanne Beckerton and her companion crossed the border in Sault Ste. Marie on Nov. 4.

“You can’t do this ahead of time; you can only do it as you’re leaving,” Beckerton explained.

Also read: The number of outbreaks related to elementary schools in Ontario has reached a new high

“We scanned our immunization proofs and passports, and everything looked to be put on our applications, and everything appeared to be fine.”

The pair was in the United States to buy a snowmobile and were told to pull over to the side when they arrived at the border.

This happened when they were asked for a QR Code, which they didn’t know was part of the ArriveCan app and needed to display to cross the border.

“The next thing I know, another officer knocks on my door and tells me you’re being quarantined for 14 days,” Beckerton explained. “(He) handed me four COVID tests and said, ‘You’re in the system, enjoy your day.'”

She stated that they were unprepared for an unexpected quarantine.

Beckerton explained, “I have no way of backing up, and there is no backup plan.”

“It took the officer three seconds at the border to put my life on hold for two weeks.” I tried calling all of the phone numbers listed on the app, but none worked. I’ve sent them an email, but they haven’t responded.”

She also contacted Carol Hughes, her local MP, but was told they could do nothing.

Hughes told CTV that she has received multiple calls from constituents concerning the ArriveCan app and advises travelers to do their homework before departing.

“There has to be a better communication channel,” she remarked. “I believe it is critical for travelers to check the website — the government website — for all of the information they require before traveling to avoid much of the difficulty that has occurred.”

The most aggravating aspect of it all, according to Beckerton, is that she can’t go to work properly.

“I’ve put my coworkers in a bad situation, and my job is critical, and I can’t go to it even though I’m completely healthy to work,” she explained.

“I want to work but am unable to do so since I am not permitted to leave the house.” It’s unjust.”

Meanwhile, CTV contacted the Canada Border Services Agency, which released the following statement:

“CBSA is unable to comment on specific cases, and we cannot guess on specific outcomes,” CBSA spokeswoman Louis-Carl Brissette Lesage said. “Each passenger presents themself to a border services officer under a distinct set of circumstances, with variable levels of information available.”

Source: CBC News

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